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Thread: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

  1. #31
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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Actually, the density of light on the moon doesn't change very much from that on earth, since most of the light comes from the sun (very little is radiated, otherwise we would fry). So within the solar system, the observed light (optically) changes very little (otherwise, we wouldn't be here, a statement of Hawking's anthropic principle). Far away from the Solar system (interstellar space), the density of light is far less, but there is still a huge tidal gravity element propelling the sun around the center of the galaxy. These frequencies are very low compared to optical signals on earth's surface (from the sun), but are great in amplitude, so the energy of a single cycle around the galaxy (for earth modeled as an electron) has a vastly different h per unit cycle than that of an electron around an atom (or a photo-electron emitted from a flat surface in the parking lot).

    Groups of galaxies spinning around each other (if/when they do) adds even more "vacuum" energy to the problem, and then the issue is whether the interactions are significant or not. (we can't do experiments on galaxies, or even planets - maybe someday on asteroids, especially if they are trying to hit us....)

    And this is NOT against the mainstream, it is beginning physics at a junior college level. Neverfly should NEVER have been a moderator, he doesn't have any idea what is taught in college physics courses.... This topic was moved without my permission.
    Last edited by BuleriaChk; 11-10-2016 at 02:27 PM.
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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    And this is NOT against the mainstream, it is beginning physics at a junior college level. Neverfly should NEVER have been a moderator, he doesn't have any idea what is taught in college physics courses.... This topic was moved without my permission.
    It is ATM. BurleriaChk has carried this misconception for 45 years or more and he is incapable of being taught.
    A constant is a constant - that is why it is a constant, not a variable.
    The constant "c" is a constant, that is why it is called a 'constant.'
    If you are calculating the speed of light in a medium, you calculate it as "v," not as "c."
    This has been pointed out many times, but Chuck lives in LaLaChuckLand and cannot hear.
    --Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges--
    “Science needs the light of free expression to flourish. It depends on the fearless questioning of authority, and the open exchange of ideas.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

    "When photons interact with electrons, they are interacting with the charge around a "bare" mass, and thus the interaction is electromagnetic, hence light. This light slows the photon down." - BuleriaChk

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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    It is ATM. BurleriaChk has carried this misconception for 45 years or more and he is incapable of being taught.
    A constant is a constant - that is why it is a constant, not a variable.
    The constant "c" is a constant, that is why it is called a 'constant.'
    If you are calculating the speed of light in a medium, you calculate it as "v," not as "c."
    This has been pointed out many times, but Chuck lives in LaLaChuckLand and cannot hear.
    Agreed,

    This is basic high school physics.^^^^^^^

    Though there can be some misconception regarding "vacuum". When we talk about "c" we are talking in terms of an actual true vacuum state, i.e complete emptiness - devoid of absolutely anything. In reality the "vacuum" of space may not be truly empty.

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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by David M W View Post
    Agreed,

    This is basic high school physics.^^^^^^^

    Though there can be some misconception regarding "vacuum". When we talk about "c" we are talking in terms of an actual true vacuum state, i.e complete emptiness - devoid of absolutely anything. In reality the "vacuum" of space may not be truly empty.
    This is true, but "c" denotes the upper bound, the speed limit of the propagation of E.M. radiation in space. So whether it truly is a vacuum/void or quantum foam or not, the measured value would remain the same.
    David M W likes this.
    --Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges--
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    "When photons interact with electrons, they are interacting with the charge around a "bare" mass, and thus the interaction is electromagnetic, hence light. This light slows the photon down." - BuleriaChk

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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    The vacuum state "c" is the energy level of the electromagnetic environment (without molecules) in the parking lot at sea level (the lowest level in our EM environment without ponderable mass). The rest mass per photo-equivalent particle is where is a scaling factor that determines rest masses of differing particles in terms of c (and thus "photons" as particle-equivalents: , where i indicates different masses for photo-equivalent particles via the de-Broglie relationship, and thus related to Planck’s constant for experiments performed in our parking lot at sea level.

    Relativistically, the photon has mass characterized by the unit circle in terms of and where per unit particle in relation to the zero point energy and variation of it in terms
    of initial and final conditions.. where a specific value of v (as a change in c from that in the parking lot at sea level) determines a relative change in photo-equivalent energy of the particle (the context can be two particles, a field and a particle, or two fields), in relation to the zero point energy (the vacuum - EM - energy of the parking lot) and variation of it in terms of initial and final conditions of photo-equivalent interactions (modeled in turn by the deBroglie relations and Planck's constant in quantum mechanics)..

    The photo-equivalent electron mass changes within matter according to the Fermi level (which accounts for the different energies between electrons and holes in semiconductors).

    The local EM field is determined by the earth (and solar system, and galaxy); gravity is lighter on the moon, and thus the density "c" of the EM field (the vacuum) at its surface is less. Gravity is stronger on the surface of Jupiter (if there is a surface) and thus the density "c" on its surface is greater. The "rest masses" of particles in the parking lots on those surfaces will change accordingly (e.g. in local semiconductors' Fermi levels).

    Neverfly has his head up his ass, and his quote of Tyson in his signature is a fraud….




    Last edited by BuleriaChk; 11-23-2016 at 07:15 PM.
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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    The vacuum state "c" is the energy level of the electromagnetic environment (without molecules) in the parking lot at sea level (the lowest level in our EM environment without ponderable mass). The rest mass per photo-equivalent particle is where is a scaling factor that determines rest masses of differing particles in terms of c (and thus "photons" as particle-equivalents: , where i indicates different masses for photo-equivalent particles via the de-Broglie relationship, and thus related to Planck’s constant for experiments performed in our parking lot at sea level.

    Relativistically, the photon has mass characterized by the unit circle in terms of and where per unit particle in relation to the zero point energy and variation of it in terms
    of initial and final conditions.. where a specific value of v (as a change in c from that in the parking lot at sea level) determines a relative change in photo-equivalent energy of the particle (the context can be two particles, a field and a particle, or two fields), in relation to the zero point energy (the vacuum - EM - energy of the parking lot) and variation of it in terms of initial and final conditions of photo-equivalent interactions (modeled in turn by the deBroglie relations and Planck's constant in quantum mechanics)..

    The photo-equivalent electron mass changes within matter according to the Fermi level (which accounts for the different energies between electrons and holes in semiconductors).

    The local EM field is determined by the earth (and solar system, and galaxy); gravity is lighter on the moon, and thus the density "c" of the EM field (the vacuum) at its surface is less. Gravity is stronger on the surface of Jupiter (if there is a surface) and thus the density "c" on its surface is greater. The "rest masses" of particles in the parking lots on those surfaces will change accordingly (e.g. in local semiconductors' Fermi levels).

    Neverfly has his head up his ass, and his quote of Tyson in his signature is a fraud….




    Wow, what a load of bullshit.
    --Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges--
    “Science needs the light of free expression to flourish. It depends on the fearless questioning of authority, and the open exchange of ideas.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

    "When photons interact with electrons, they are interacting with the charge around a "bare" mass, and thus the interaction is electromagnetic, hence light. This light slows the photon down." - BuleriaChk

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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Not only that, but the energy in the parking lot is different in the daytime than the night time.

    Neverfly has an unwarranted arrogance as a moderator (Tom's fault) and a profound ignorance about modern physics. I doubt if he even knows about potential wells, much less has solved a single boundary equation involving particle capture - a requirement for a first lower division course in quantum mechanics ....

    Any physicist (or at least an upper division student in physics at a community college) will understand my previous post. Neverfly is afraid to ask anyone what a Fermi level means because he is afraid that everyone will find out that he has no idea...
    Last edited by BuleriaChk; 11-23-2016 at 08:34 PM.
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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    This from the guy that "proved" Fermats last theorem using the Binomial theorem and poor ol' Pauli.
    --Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges--
    “Science needs the light of free expression to flourish. It depends on the fearless questioning of authority, and the open exchange of ideas.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

    "When photons interact with electrons, they are interacting with the charge around a "bare" mass, and thus the interaction is electromagnetic, hence light. This light slows the photon down." - BuleriaChk

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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    This from the guy that "proved" Fermats last theorem using the Binomial theorem and poor ol' Pauli.
    This from a guy who has no idea what I am talking about, including Pauli and the Binomial Theorem.. and can't even write Fermat's Theorem correctly (and most certainly has never tried to prove it himself).

    Neverfly is an intellectual fraud....

    The constant "c" arose in the context of the speed of light, NOT as an invariant element of Foundations of Mathematics (i.e., an integer or even a terminated real number). To claim that I said "a constant is not really a constant" is misleading and a lie. I said "the speed of light, if represented by the symbol c, is different in a medium than in vacuo, which is the foundation of geometric optics and refraction in every elementary physics course in high school in the whole world.

    In that context, Neverfly said the speed of light didn't change EVER due to a ridiculous model that claimed solids were a form of gas in which light was absorbed and re-emitted by free atoms within a sold volume (even a piece of steel), and therefore laser light didn't actually slow down (it just bounces around inside as if atoms were mirrors), even though it takes some time to burn through said steel, which also, uh, gets hot and melts. Since fire is electromagnetic radiation, it is also obvious to anyone who has ever seen a welder at work Hey, or cooked a hamburger.

    I am NOT mischaracterizing him here, either; he actually tried to defend this position (and apparently still does). Maybe by now he has consulted Wikipedia or at least asked a local science teacher....

    Optical lenses are slightly more subtle than lasers through steel, but refraction has been known for, uh, quite some time now....

    Neverfly showed a complete ignorance of energy deposition on and within solid materials (so obviously has no knowledge of the mechanisms of conduction, radiation from antennas, and led emission from semiconductors either....

    Who the hell ever gave him the power to be a moderator in a technical forum?
    Last edited by BuleriaChk; 11-23-2016 at 11:14 PM.
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    Default Re: "The constant 'c' has variable value" by BuleriaChk

    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    and can't even write Fermat's Theorem correctly (and most certainly has never tried to prove it himself).
    You have been repeatedly challenged to quote where I wrote it wrong... You never do quote it. You never do explain it. Do you know why Chuck?
    Because you are Lying.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    I said "the speed of light, if represented by the symbol c, is different in a medium than in vacuo, which is the foundation of geometric optics and refraction in every elementary physics course in high school in the whole world.
    No, you said that the constant "c" is different in a gravity well and you even ran a bunch of ill-informed calculations upon that claim and worse, tried to apply the time dilation equation to a photon!

    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    In that context, Neverfly said the speed of light didn't change EVER due to a ridiculous model that claimed solids were a form of gas in which light was absorbed and re-emitted by free atoms within a sold volume (even a piece of steel),
    I never made this claim - AT ALL. I said that the constant "c" does not change and that that the Speed of Light is calculated with "v" in a medium. I have said that photons always move at "c" even if the Group Velocity of a beam moves at less than "c." You are Lying, again, Chuck. Partly because you cannot fathom that Speed of Light and the constant "c" are not always the same thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    I am NOT mischaracterizing him here, either; he actually tried to defend this position (and apparently still does). Maybe by now he has consulted Wikipedia or at least asked a local science teacher....
    Yes, you absolutely did mis-characterize. I successfully defended the position and you have done nothing except whine and try to weasel your way out of the absolute bullhockey you have posted on the topic. Try as you might, but you cannot weasel your way out of claiming you were 'misunderstood' in your attempts to apply the time dilation equation to a photon.


    Now... I for one have had just about enough of your intellectual dishonesty... It's not like this forum is hopping busy so...

    You have been challenged to address this with the quote:
    Quote Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
    and can't even write Fermat's Theorem correctly
    over 10 or more times... Take three days off to think about it addressing that very, very simple challenge. If you return but throw one of your stink-fits and do not address where I supposedly mis-wrote Fermats Last Theorem, you will take another three days off and this will continue until you address it.
    --Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges--
    “Science needs the light of free expression to flourish. It depends on the fearless questioning of authority, and the open exchange of ideas.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

    "When photons interact with electrons, they are interacting with the charge around a "bare" mass, and thus the interaction is electromagnetic, hence light. This light slows the photon down." - BuleriaChk

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