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Thread: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

  1. #1
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    Default Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    From my layperson understanding, an object closer to mass experiences faster time relative to an object farther away from a mass.

    So, you might say the earth is a time island relative to the space occupied by the solar system, and the solar system a time island in respect to our star cluster, our star cluster in respect to the galaxy, etc.

    If this is the case, what about an object which would happen to be in some point in the universe at the farthest distance between any surrounding galaxies. How much time has elapsed for this object since the big bang ?

    Just wondering.

    :-)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    That object would be older

    Look at it as space-time, not like space and time. No two "objects" have the same "age". Time flows slower in a gravitanonal field. The gravitanional field close to the earth centre is stronger than the field in the atmosphere. So given these two facts your feet are younger than your head.

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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    Oh I had it in reverse. But now I am considering a person whose head is on the earth, and another whose head is out in space somewhere a huge distance from any source of mass. Since time goes faster without the effect of mass, the head way out in space might say "Wow a couple of (seconds, minutes, years, eons) ago there was this huge explosion", while on earth we "experienced" the big bang as extremely ancient history. I guess what I am asking is that at some approaching infinite distance from any source of matter does time dissapear ? Thanks for humoring me :-)

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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    Hmm interesting point, never thought of it that way. I don't think so, but we would never know for sure would we. I wasn't trying to humor you, that's an example I always use.

    At a site where no mass has influence I belive we still have time but it would be hard to prove, and above all pointless.

    Cheers
    L-zr

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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    Thanks.

    Thinking about it some more today. If I had a spaceship (which could go extremely fast) and software that continually picked destination points that were progressively farther and farther away from any matter, I THINK eventually the software would have to fail, it would not be able to find a point that was further away than the one I was currently at. This is just another way of saying that the universe is a closed system, some kind of sphere, due to the dependence of space time on matter. I think I have read / seen depictions of the Universe as a bubble.

    Still another way to say this, is at some large but finite distance from the center of the Universe, if I were to start traveling in a completely straight line in my (extremely fast) space ship, I would end up where I started due to the curvature of space around the center of the Universe. I would be at the edge of the Universe. So there has to be one single point in this "spherical" Universe that is most distant from any other point in the system.

    Now I will complete the idea in the first paragraph. If, and this is my simplistic layman understanding, the Universe was indeed created by a "big bang" of a defined tiny duration (to our reference plane) and the Universe has since been expanding (I know the data indicates that it is expanding now, this is taken for certain, right ?), then the point at which my software fails WOULD HAVE TO BE at the center of the Universe. It must be the point that is the most distant from any matter, correct ?

    And a "head" at that center point, in reference to our head here on earth would be witnessing universal events at a pace, again with reference to the "head" on earth, very much greater. It is the place in the Universe where time is the fastest. And as long as the Universe is expanding, and the matter receding, the faster time is moving at this center point. What is the limit ?

    way way too much internet for this boy ;-)

    cb

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    That would be the topology of space.

    imagine you were a 2-dimensional being living on a flat surface. Now curl that surface into a globe. Where on that surface would you say the centre is?

    Time is "running" at the speed of light. When you are running or being in a strong gravitational field then time is slowing down.

    Cheers
    L-zr

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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    Yes, again my bad. A simplistic interpretation of the "big bang" as an explosion, with the substance of the new universe being "thrown out" from the center of origin. I do understand it as the "big expansion". I am assuming at this point, that energy / energy coalescing into matter, was somewhat randomly dispersed (don't know why I would assume this) in the very early universe. So the expanding universe isn't a ring of energy / matter moving out from the center, it is a "random" distribution of galaxies all moving away from each other.

    So my software WOULD find one point in the universe that was farthest away from all matter, but it would be at some random point not necessarily the center. I just know at some time there was a debate if the Universe would keep on expanding, or start contracting. So I have just been wondering, again, as it continues to expand what is the nature of time at this most distant point in reference to our own, as matter / energy continues to move away from it. How much faster is time in comparison to our frame of reference, and is there a limit to this increase as the expansion continues (maybe at which point the universe starts contracting), or does it just continue to approach 0 on the asymptote ?

    :-)

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    Default Re: Question about the nature of time relative to gravity - time islands ?

    In case of you standing still in a low gravity field, time would run at the speed of light.

    If you start moving time will slow down, and also if for some reason the gravity field is strengthened.

    Now for this to be measurable it would have to be significant. The GPS system need to take this into consideration.

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